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Shale Revolution: Myths and Realities

Shale Revolution: Myths and Realities

The boom in shale gas production in the US and its wide-ranging influence on markets rocked the gas world. Liquefied gas deliveries were redirected, altering the already fragile balance of demand and supply in traditional markets for pipeline gas in Europe.

The psychological effect proved just as strong. Many began to speak about a "shale revolution," a technological breakthrough, and an upcoming realignment of the global gas industry.

Major corporations began to look for opportunities to participate in this business. The governments of nations depending on the import of gas see in shale their salvation and freedom. Experts predict a decline of the "era of diktat" on the part of conventional natural gas exporters.

As is the case with every fashion trend, however, there is a great deal of emotion involved, and it is only in time that one begins to realise the potential lifespan of the trend and its objective limitations. Still, we will try look into this matter seriously and without making "hot-on-the-heels" conclusions.

The report elaborates on the following issues:

  • Technological and commercial reasons for the growth of shale gas production in the USA
  • The reality of the "export of revolution". Challenges and opportunities for the development of shale gas in the EU
  • The prospects of shale gas in China
  • The Russian experience in shale gas
  • Forecast of production of shale gas and its impact on the global gas market

The contents of the report:

Introduction 2
Background 2
Shale Rush 3
Global Reserves 4
Chapter 1. US Shale Boom 5
1.1. Growth in Shale Gas Production in US 5
1.2. Reserves: US Shale ‘G6’ 6
   1.2.1 Barnett Shale () 7
   1.2.2 Fayetteville Shale (Arkansas, Eastern Oklahoma)) 9
   1.2.3. Woodford (Oklahoma) 10
   1.2.4. Haynesville Shale (Louisiana, Eastern Texas) 11
   1.2.5. Marcellus (Northwest of US) 12
   1.2.6. Antrim Shale (Michigan) 12
   1.2.7. New Albany Shale (Illinois, Indiana, Northern Kentucky) 13
1.3. Official, Corporate Forecasts of Sector Development 13
Chapter 2. United States Shale Boom Economics, Environmental Issues 15
2.1. Gas Prices in US 15
2.2. Economics of Shale Projects, Financial Position of Gas Companies 18
2.3. Slow Reaction of Oil & Gas Corporations 21
2.4. Environmental Issues of Shale Development 24
Chapter 3. Export of Shale Revolution to Europe, China: Realities and Myths 26
3.1. EU Shale Reserves, Grounds for Shale Rush 27
3.2. European Countries’ Shale Development Successes, Failures 28
   3.2.1.  Poland 28
   3.2.2.  Sweden 29
   3.2.3.  UK, Netherlands 30
   3.2.4.  Austria 30
   3.2.5.  France 30
   3.2.6. Germany, Hungary 31
   3.2.7.  Ukraine 31
3.3. Stimuli, Limiters 31
3.4. Chinese Gas Market 33
3.5  Shales in China, Coal-bed Methane Production 34
Chapter 4. Shale Future: Is It Worth the Effort? 37
4.1. Development Prospects for US Shale Gas Business 37
4.2. What Dreams May Come: What ‘Shale Project’ in Europe Costs 39
4.3. China Unconventional: Pricing Revision 41
4.4. Shale Potential in Russia 42
Date of release: June, 2010

 

 


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